Вадим Дудченко
Администратор портала

NASA has released a beautiful image snapped by the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope of the open star cluster NGC 1755.

This Hubble image shows NGC 1755, an open star cluster some 160,000 light-years away in the southern constellation of Dorado. The color image was made from separate exposures taken in the ultraviolet, visible and near-infrared regions of the spectrum with Hubble’s Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). Three filters were used to sample various wavelengths. The color results from assigning different hues to each monochromatic image associated with an individual filter. Image credit: NASA / ESA / Hubble / A. Milone / G. Gilmore.

NGC 1755 is located approximately 160,000 light-years away in the southern constellation of Dorado.

This stellar cluster resides in the Large Magellanic Cloud, a satellite of our Milky Way Galaxy.

NGC 1755 is about 120 light-years across and is approximately 80 million years old.

Also designated as ESO 56-28, it was discovered on October 3, 1826, by the Scottish astronomer James Dunlop.

“Star clusters are gravitationally bound collections of stars, and come in two main varieties:” Hubble astronomers said.

“(i) smaller open clusters like NGC 1755, which are hosts to younger stars; and (ii) gargantuan globular clusters, which can contain millions of older stars.”

Hubble gazed into the heart of NGC 1755 in order to better understand how different populations of stars can co-exist in a single cluster.

“A population of stars is a group of stars with similar properties such as age or chemical composition, and these populations provide astronomers with valuable insights into the births, lives, and deaths of stars,” the researchers explained.

“Clusters in the Magellanic Clouds are particularly useful natural laboratories thanks to their proximity to the Milky Way.”

“Hubble’s eagle-eyed vision was a vital asset when observing NGC 1755 — with so many stars packed into a small area of sky, Hubble’s high-resolution Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) and Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3) allowed individual stars in the cluster to be distinguished.”

 



Actual news

  • Sunday
  • Day
  • Month